Posted by: Sahasi | March 11, 2009

Justin, Texas – An American Village

Yesterday we had to travel to a small town known as Justin, about 35 miles from Carrollton, Tx. When I first heard the name Justin, my mind immediately went back to Bangalore, India where our office assistant was named Justin. So I wondered what kind of a city this was named Justin… Nevertheless we drove down the highway to reach the rickety town of Justin dominated by horse and cattle ranches.

According to the city website, this area was originally settled by a band of French colonists who in 1848 established the Icarian Colony. The community was abandoned a year later, and the area remained sparsely populated until the early 1880’s. The formation of the city started in 1883, when one Chet Helm and Riley started selling town lots.

Within the year a general store opened and the community became a center for farmers. Four years later, the Santa Fe extended its rail line from Fort Worth to Purcell, Oklahoma, laying tracks near the growing community. In January 1887, the community petitioned postal authorities for a post office to be named Justin, in honor of Justin Sherman, chief engineer of the Santa Fe rail line. By 1886, Justin had a population of 100, a general store, a grocery, a hotel and a cotton gin. The addition of grain elevators, frozen-food lockers, and paved roads established Justin as a shipping point for agricultural products. Today it is still a small city with a population of about 3,000.

City Park, Justin

Trading Post (Antique Store), Justin

Water Supply location for Justin city

Any city in US must have a church….

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